How to vote on the three NYC ballot proposals

DENVER, CO - October 13: Denver Election judges survey and check voting ballots filled out by members of the Logic and Accuracy Test Board during a test of the ballot system in the counting room at the Denver Elections headquarters October 13, 2016. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post)

After you vote in tomorrow’s general election, make sure you flip your ballot to vote on the three ballot proposals.

These proposals were the result of the mayor’s charter commission. His office wants New Yorkers to vote yes on all three.

But we disagree, and we will explain why below. Remember just how much de Blasio has worked against neighborhood voices here in Middle Village.

Now he wants to have even more power over communities with his second and third proposal. That’s why we say vote no on proposals 2 and 3.

Here’s what we recommend:

Ballot proposal #1: Campaign Finance Alterations
Why you should vote YES
By voting yes, and raising the amount of public matching funds for candidates, you are helping someone who is not financed by less than transparent, less than desirable interests run for office.

Ballot proposal #2: Civic Engagement Proposal
Why you should vote NO
Don’t let the mayor give his pals a bunch of vague titles on the appointed “civic engagement commission.” Instead, we should have more community participation instead of having the voices of the community ignored.

Ballot Proposal #3: Term limits on Community Boards
Why you should vote NO

If appointed community board members have to apply to the borough president, for renewal every two years, why would term limits make sense? Let’s not forget the importance of institutional memory on our community boards.

To read our full opinion, visit the Queens Ledger’s NYC Ballot Proposals Vote YES NO and NO piece.

Middle Village House of the Week 11/3/18

mv home eliot hill realty

This detached home is Middle Village’s House of the Week.
The house sits on a 55×90 lot and features six bedrooms in addition to three full bathrooms. While the house was built in 1945, it was renovated in 2007. There are hardwood floors throughout, plenty of closet space, a beautiful den, a finished basement with gas fireplace and an above ground pool.
The seller is motivated!
The property is listed by Eliot Hill Realty for $1,698,000.

Middle Village House of the Week 10/27/18

Middle Village house

The Middle Village House of the Week is a solid brick ranch-style home.
The home offers a generous living room, 2 bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms, a lovely backyard with a spacious paver patio and much more. It’s also located to the express bus to Manhattan and highly-rated schools. It’s also located just steps from Juniper Park!
The property is listed by Eliot Hill Realty for $729,000.

Middle Village school evacuated this morning

Photo: Google Maps/William Meaney

Photo: Google Maps/William Meaney

P.S./I.S. 128 in Middle Village was evacuated this morning.

When students and staff arrived to the school, some smelled something burning. Turns out, there was smoke from a rubbish fire at a neighboring construction site, which seeped into the building. About 30 children and several adults experienced issues from the smoke inhalation. No one at the school required hospitalization.

The school quickly alerted the fire department and firefighters evacuated the school while they investigated.

Firefighters deemed the school safe and everyone was allowed back into the building, a school official said. Normal classes and schedules have resumed.

P.S./I.S. 128 is located at 69-10 65th Drive.

NYPD NCO program comes to 104th Precinct

104_NCO_Rollout_1

Neighborhood policing has finally arrived at the 104th Precinct.

On Monday, NYPD brass announced that the new policing philosophy and program will be implemented in Ridgewood, Glendale, Maspeth and Middle Village.

Three-and-a-half years after the police department launched the initiative, all neighborhood precincts in the city will eventually have an NCO program. It has also been introduced to nine public housing areas, half of the NYPD’s transit districts and, by the end of the year, every school district.

“The message is public safety is a shared responsibility,” said Police Commissioner James O’Neill. “It’s that credo, that understanding, that’s guiding our evolution.

“In 2018, this is where we need to be as a police department, and this is where we need to be as a city of 8.6 million New Yorkers,” he added. “This is how we’re going to make our way forward.”

Read the full story on the Queens Ledger.